14-18 years – Take the lead, work together, and embrace new experiences

‘To anyone who hasn’t tried Scouting before, I’d say come on up and have a go! I think that most people don’t really know that Scouting is about activities, friendship and meeting people from other countries. I’ve been in the Movement since I was a Beaver and I still love it!’

With the support, direction and guidance of Unit leaders, Explorer Scouts are encouraged to lead themselves, design their own programme and work towards the top awards that Scouting offers. With exciting prospects like being a part of camps and expeditions both home and abroad; adventurous activities such as mountaineering, parascending and off shore sailing; Explorers offers fun and adventure for all. Explorers also have the opportunity to be a part of The Explorer Scout Young Leaders’ Scheme which develops their leadership skills and sense of responsibility, by helping to run meetings for younger sections.

 

 

Explorer Units are the fourth Section of the Scouting family after Beavers, Cubs and Scouts. Explorer Scouts are young people aged between 14 and 18 years old. There is flexibility in the age range: young people can join from age 13½ but cannot move to Scout Network until 18. Young people must have left the Explorer Scout section before the date of their 18th birthday.

 

Structure and meetings

A group of Explorer Scouts is called a Unit and is part of the District’s provision of Scouting. An Explorer Scout Unit and a Scout Group may work together under a Partnership Agreement, which should set out clearly the links between the Unit and the Group, arrangements for communication, use of equipment, facilities and resources.

The key to running a successful Explorer Unit is flexibility. Due to the other commitments that crop up in a teenager’s life, such as exams, it is important that the programme reflects this. For example, Units may not every week, or carry out the majority of activities at weekends.

 

Activities

Explorer Scouts are encouraged to take part in a wide range of activities as part of their programme including traditional Scouting skills, such as camping, survival and cooking, as well as a wider spectrum of adventurous activities, from abseiling to zorbing.

The Explorer programme should be supplemented and complemented by events and activities delivered across the District, allowing them the opportunity to socialise and work with other local Explorer Units.

Find an Explorer Group near you.

The Scout Scout Law

A Scout is to be trusted.

A Scout is loyal.

A Scout is friendly and considerate.

A Scout belongs to the world-wide family of Scouts.

A Scout has courage under all difficulties.

A Scout makes good use of time and is careful of possessions and property.

A Scout has self-respect and respect for others.

 

The Scout Promise

For alternative variations of the  Scout Promise please click here

 

CLICK ON THE IMAGE BELOW TO DOWNLOAD A COMPLETE PARENTS GUIDE TO EXPLORER SCOUTS

 

What do Explorers wear?

Once they’ve had time to settle in to the group, Explorers get their own set of uniform to wear during meetings and on trips away. Usually, this consists of a beige shirt or blouse with their badges sewn on, which they pair with their Unit scarf – if they’re an independent Unit – or Group scarf, if their Unit is merged with a Scout Troop. This will vary slightly if your Explorer Unit is part of the Air Scouts or Sea Scouts. See below for uniform diagrams.

Alongside their shirts, Explorers might wear the accompanying blue uniform trousers or skirt, or they might save their uniform bottoms to wear for special occasions like awards ceremonies and public events – choosing to wear something more casual with their shirt during the week.   Optional accessories such as hats, hoodies, are also available.

Where can I buy my uniform?

Uniform can either be bought from our online shop – Scout Store – or from a local supplier. If you’re not sure where to start, or could use a little help with uniform costs, fear not. Your Explorer leader can chat to you about options. The most important thing when you first arrive is wearing something that you feel natural and comfortable in.

Where to sew those badges…

 

 


 

Scouting provides a second family to lots of young people. It’s a safe place where they can aspire and grow.'
Bear Grylls, Chief Scout Bear Grylls